Before I was using this blog as just a place to post the random things I found and liked on tumblr. I'm going to try a new thing with this blog however. I will post about current and past things of historical and political importance to discuss how America got to this point

progressivefriends:

america-wakiewakie:

Cops Confiscate Basketball Goal From Neighborhood Kids, And Drive it Away. Seriously | The Free Thought Project 

…The Cleveland Police Department actually confiscated a basketball goal and ticketed the owner for having it.

According to Toledo News Now, as a kind gesture a woman, Cheri Fiorilli, had bought the goal for her neighbors for helping her out.

But in Cleveland it happens to be illegal to play basketball in the street.

So here come Cleveland’s finest to save the day!

Cell phone video shows she asked if there could be a warning. An officer answered, “There’s nothing I can do.”

She offered to move it immediately, and she was told there’s no leeway.

Fiorilli and the kids were left stunned, and video shows an officer grew impatient with her.

“I need to see your driver’s license again. If not, I have to arrest you for refusing to comply,” said the officer.

Fiorilli got a ticket as well, since she declared herself the owner.

It would not have been surprising to see this poor woman be tasered by these jackboots.

Do police not even care anymore about public relations? Or, in this case, do they not even care about looking like complete tyrant morons who would confiscate a basketball goal from children to enforce some bureaucratic ‘red tape’ law?

Apparently some cops will enforce any law, no matter how arbitrary or ridiculous. Ready to move on yet America?

(Read Full Text)

vicemag:

The fact that Sharpton dealt in the underworld 30 years ago isn’t really news. The value of the Smoking Gun report is mainly historic—it offers a glimpse into Sharpton’s past life, before Obama and MSNBC, Upper West Side apartments, and private cigar clubs. It takes us back to a time when Al Sharpton wore tracksuits, weighed 300 pounds, and incited riots. Which gets at the real question: Why are we still talking about Al Sharpton?

vicemag:

The fact that Sharpton dealt in the underworld 30 years ago isn’t really news. The value of the Smoking Gun report is mainly historic—it offers a glimpse into Sharpton’s past life, before Obama and MSNBC, Upper West Side apartments, and private cigar clubs. It takes us back to a time when Al Sharpton wore tracksuits, weighed 300 pounds, and incited riots. Which gets at the real question: Why are we still talking about Al Sharpton?

roshistarpupil:

adslibitum:

© Ads Libitum : facebook / tumblr / behance

OMG

corpsepose:

happy easter

(Source: gingerdeer)

letterstomycountry:

portiaofourchambers:

via.
This is a pretty helpful infographic, but like most “know your rights” information out there, it raises more questions than it answers.  
Generally speaking, I tell clients, friends and family that in a police encounter the best thing to do is be respectful and truthful. If you don’t feel like you can tell the truth without getting into trouble or arousing further suspicion, ask if you are free to leave, and if you are told you are not free to leave, inform the officer that you will not be answering any more questions until you have spoken with an attorney.  Then just stand your ground, continue to be respectful and polite but don’t say anything more.
"I’m sorry, officer, I don’t consent to searches," is a great phrase to have in your back pocket.  And you guys — don’t consent to searches.  Even if you believe you have nothing to hide.

LTMC: I like to tell people that it’s not their job to help the Government prove them guilty of anything.  Never consent to searches.  Always say “no” when they ask you if you know why they pulled you over, even if you think you do (you’re not in the officer’s head, and they may have pulled you over for a different reason.  Don’t accidentally implicate yourself to another crime!).  
Never give them more information than they ask for.  Keep your answers as brief as possible.  Even if you think you have nothing to hide, you’d be surprised how often people are breaking the law without even realizing it.  Giving elaborate answers may inadvertently provide police probable cause to search you or your vehicle.
They can ask you for your driver’s license and registration, and in New York, they can ask you to take a breathalyzer (you technically can refuse, but if you do, it’s an automatic license revocation).  Police can also order you to step out of your vehicle.  Even if they start to search you or your car illegally, let them do it.  Don’t be a martyr.  You’ll just get yourself into more trouble.  It’s not fair, but it’s reality.  Remember, they have a gun.  And they’re far more concerned about their own safety than yours.  Challenge it in court, not on the sidewalk.
With that being said, I’m in the process of writing an article premised on the idea that no attorney should advise a client to voluntarily speak to the police under any circumstances—even if they witness or are a victim of criminal activity*—because anecdotal evidence suggests it will always be against their penal interest to do so, absent structural reforms in the law.
People do dumb and/or weird things when they’re in stressful situations.  They say things they don’t mean.  They utter sentences that come out wrong.  They misspeak.  They remember things wrong.  They give vague answers that can be interpreted in multiple ways.  This creates a high risk of accidentally implicating yourself in a crime.  It’s even higher when you’re being detained.  
Other times, people simply react as one would expect, and they end up paying for it. Like Kenny Dixon, who discovered his stepson’s dead body in his garage after the latter committed suicide.  A police officer at the scene grabbed Dixon’s arm and tried to push him away from his stepson’s body.  Dixon, who was understandably inconsolable, asked the officer not to touch him.  Dixon was tackled, punched, and beaten by several officers at the scene, then arrested and charged a felony.  Thank goodness the police were there to help the victim’s family cope with their grief!
So yes, don’t talk to the police unless you have to.  If you’re being detained, don’t consent to searches, always answer “no” when asked if you know why you’re being detained, and don’t give them more information than they ask for.  Even fi you think you’re helping your case, it’s far more likely that you aren’t.

*(excepting mandatory reporting laws, of course)

letterstomycountry:

portiaofourchambers:

via.

This is a pretty helpful infographic, but like most “know your rights” information out there, it raises more questions than it answers.  

Generally speaking, I tell clients, friends and family that in a police encounter the best thing to do is be respectful and truthful. If you don’t feel like you can tell the truth without getting into trouble or arousing further suspicion, ask if you are free to leave, and if you are told you are not free to leave, inform the officer that you will not be answering any more questions until you have spoken with an attorney.  Then just stand your ground, continue to be respectful and polite but don’t say anything more.

"I’m sorry, officer, I don’t consent to searches," is a great phrase to have in your back pocket.  And you guys — don’t consent to searches.  Even if you believe you have nothing to hide.

LTMC: I like to tell people that it’s not their job to help the Government prove them guilty of anything.  Never consent to searches.  Always say “no” when they ask you if you know why they pulled you over, even if you think you do (you’re not in the officer’s head, and they may have pulled you over for a different reason.  Don’t accidentally implicate yourself to another crime!).  

Never give them more information than they ask for.  Keep your answers as brief as possible.  Even if you think you have nothing to hide, you’d be surprised how often people are breaking the law without even realizing it.  Giving elaborate answers may inadvertently provide police probable cause to search you or your vehicle.

They can ask you for your driver’s license and registration, and in New York, they can ask you to take a breathalyzer (you technically can refuse, but if you do, it’s an automatic license revocation).  Police can also order you to step out of your vehicle.  Even if they start to search you or your car illegally, let them do it.  Don’t be a martyr.  You’ll just get yourself into more trouble.  It’s not fair, but it’s reality.  Remember, they have a gun.  And they’re far more concerned about their own safety than yours.  Challenge it in court, not on the sidewalk.

With that being said, I’m in the process of writing an article premised on the idea that no attorney should advise a client to voluntarily speak to the police under any circumstances—even if they witness or are a victim of criminal activity*—because anecdotal evidence suggests it will always be against their penal interest to do so, absent structural reforms in the law.

People do dumb and/or weird things when they’re in stressful situations.  They say things they don’t mean.  They utter sentences that come out wrong.  They misspeak.  They remember things wrong.  They give vague answers that can be interpreted in multiple ways.  This creates a high risk of accidentally implicating yourself in a crime.  It’s even higher when you’re being detained.  

Other times, people simply react as one would expect, and they end up paying for it. Like Kenny Dixon, who discovered his stepson’s dead body in his garage after the latter committed suicide.  A police officer at the scene grabbed Dixon’s arm and tried to push him away from his stepson’s body.  Dixon, who was understandably inconsolable, asked the officer not to touch him.  Dixon was tackled, punched, and beaten by several officers at the scene, then arrested and charged a felony.  Thank goodness the police were there to help the victim’s family cope with their grief!

So yes, don’t talk to the police unless you have to.  If you’re being detained, don’t consent to searches, always answer “no” when asked if you know why you’re being detained, and don’t give them more information than they ask for.  Even fi you think you’re helping your case, it’s far more likely that you aren’t.

*(excepting mandatory reporting laws, of course)

scarymarymusic:

Nirvana - Where Did You Sleep Last Night

d0penati0n:

dope

d0penati0n:

dope

(Source: d0penati0n)

marcovicci:

there are serously people in this day and age who do Not Tip, they say “oh i don’t tip” like it’s a charming character trait. don’t talk to these people. dont look at them. these people should be required to tell their waitresses that they don’t tip before service starts. let the chips fall where they may

(Source: satanfictive-old)

Be wary of the man who urges an action in which he himself incurs no risk.

—Joaquin Setanti. (via quotedojo)